Marc Straus

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July 12, 2018 Back To News

Jeanne Silverthorne new work in group exhibition “Position Matters”


Jeanne Silverthorne’s new work “Melancholia is not Pessimism” is included in the group exhibition “Position Matters”, curated by Saul Ostrow on view at Galerie Richard, July 13 – August 25, 2018.

Bringing together artists working with a diverse array of material and conceptual concerns, Position Matters presents works where siting and location play a critical role in the viewer’s experience and comprehension of the work. Curator Saul Ostrow states, “The artists in Position Matters abandon the frame, traditional formats, the pedestal, and placing things at eye level. They align their works with the body and address the viewer somatically and cognitively. By doing so the work becomes more a presence, an intervention, an event.”

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR
Saul Ostrow is a critic and the founder of Critical Practices Inc., an organization that fosters research, teaching, and practices dedicated to social discourse and change. A renowned thinker and writer, he has four decades of experience in the contemporary art world as critic, curator, and educator.

He previously was Chair of Visual Arts and Technology at The Cleveland Institute of Art and Director of the Center for Visual Art and Culture at The University of Connecticut. He is Art Editor at Large at Bomb Magazine and was the Editor of the Routledge book series Critical Voices in Art, Theory and Culture.

Opening Reception: Saturday, July 14, 6-8pm

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